INTERNATIONAL POLITICS @ THE MILLENNIUM / CITY COLLEGE


DEPARTMENT HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES PROGRAMME ALL BACHELOR (HONS) PROGRAMMES
MOD. CODE POL203 MODULE TITLE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS @ THE MILLENNIUM
CREDITS   SEMESTER/SESSION AUTUMN/2003-2004
STAFF Dr. MILTIADIS SARIGIANNIDIS STAFF OFFICE  

E-MAIL: m.sarigiannidis@city.academic.gr
URL ADDRESS www.sarigiannidis.gr

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Focusing on the realities of politics in a rapidly globalizing world, International Politics @ the Millennium covers the latest developments in global welfare and global conflict. The course encourages the students to think critically about the shape of international relations in the coming century and to explore the global agenda. Apart from the task of a theoretical interpretation of world politics and the need for a systematic understanding of international relations, there are several challenging issues to focus on, using relevant case studies, among which; the importance of ethics and international law in world politics, the role of state, foreign policy decision-making and diplomacy, the rise and necessity of international organizations (i.e. United Nations, NATO, European Union) and the emergence of non-state actors in modern world (i.e. Microsoft, Greenpeace, UK), the essence of human rights, the imperative of international peace and security, the causes of war, the politics of identity and culture, the power of nationalism and religion, terrorism and liberation movements, environmental politics, and info-democracy and the CNN effect.

AIMS
This module aims to:
  • Critically analyse the major contending perspectives on international relations, and explain the sources of their conflicting perspectives on interpreting the international political system.
  • Understand the significance of major events shaping the international system over the past century.
  • Introduce the students to the reformed global agenda and make them aware of the modern complexity and interdependence.
  • Identify and appreciate the significance of the principal issues, arenas, actors and institutions in international relations.
  • Analyze selected global issues and cases which illustrate both some critical recent transitions in international relations, and also signify important challenges to the emerging post-Cold War international system.
  • Acquire the knowledge and methodology to move towards an in-depth understanding of international politics.
  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
    By the end of the module, a student will be able to:
  • Become more fully aware of his/her role and responsibilities as global citizen, and of the consequences of his/her lifestyle choices upon global issues.
  • Develop critical skills and filter manipulated input provided by control mechanisms such as media, state propaganda etc.
  • Shape a political identity within a cosmopolitan framework.
  • TEACHING & LEARNING METHODS
    The format of this course is that of a lecture/discussion i.e. the presentation of material for a short period followed by questions, comments and discussion is an open-ended manner before moving on. The format is informal and students are encouraged strongly to intervene and develop writing and oral skills through the construction of arguments no matter how radical.

    ASSESSMENT METHODS
    Coursework: 50% - Formal Examination: 50%
    Debate: This is a trial to test your argumentative ability and your readiness to defend your beliefs, or even defend what you do not believe! [20%].
    Research Paper: The research paper is your chance to improve your research, writing and methodological skills. A ten pages assignment is required, with a minimum of five non-electronic references [20%].
    Oral Presentation: You are asked to provide a brief synopsis of your research paper in 5 minutes, without using slides, power point presentations or papers [10%].
    Final Exam: The standard form. You have to answer twenty multiple-choice questions, two out of four theoretical topics and one out of three open discussion topics [50%].

    RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOK(S)
    Charles W. Jr. Kegley & Eugene R. Wittkopf (2001), World Politics, Boston & New York: St. Martin's Press, Inc., 8th edn.

    LIST OF REFERENCES / ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
  • Hedley Bull, The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics - 303.482 BUL 2nd ed.
  • Martin Wight, International Theory: The Three Traditions - 303.482 WIG.
  • Richard Little & Michael Smith (eds.), Perspectives on World Politics - 303.482 PER 2nd ed.
  • Kalev Holsti, International Politics: A Framework for Analysis - 303.482 HOL 7th ed.
  • David Held et al, Global Transformations: Politics, Economics and Culture - 337 GLO.
  • Peter Calvocoressi, Time for Peace: Pacifism, Internationalism and Protest in the Reduction of War - 327.172 CAL.
  • James E. Dougherty & Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., Contending Theories of International Relations: A Comprehensive Survey - 327.101 DOU 5th ed.
  • Muthiah Alagappa & Takashi Inoguchi, International Security Management and the United Nations - 341.523 INT.
  • Robert Jackson & Georg Sorensen, Introduction to International Relations - 327.1 JAC.
  • Theodore A. Couloumbis & James H. Wolfe, Introduction to International Relations: Power and Justice - 303.482 COU 4th ed.
  • Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, & Pamela Aall, Turbulent Peace: the Challenges of Managing International Conflict - 327.17 TUR.
  • OUTLINE
    COURSE OUTLINE
    NOTE: You have to study the textbook. Additionally, books have been reserved at the library to help you integrate your knowledge.

    Week #1: Introduction To International Relations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 3-23.
    Week #2: Contending Theories of International Relations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 25-49.
    Week #3: Contending Theories of International Relations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 25-49.
    Week #4: Foreign Policy Decision Making
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 53-84.
    Week #5: Great Power Rivalries & Relations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 85-122.
    Week #6: Intergovernmental Organisations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 171-200 & pp. 618-633.
    Week #7: CONSOLIDATION WEEK / DEBATE
    Week #8: Nongovernmental Organisations
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 201-241
    Week #9: Armed Conflict Between & Within States
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 407-453
    Week #10: Coercive Diplomacy & Legal Regulation of War
    Reading:
    Kegley & Wittkopf (2001), pp. 507-547 & pp. 606-633.
    Week #11: Oral Presentations - Discussion
    Week #12: Oral Presentations - Discussion - Revision
    The outline is tentative and subject to changes